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. >>> and more now on japan's nuclear crisis and concern about the risks from radiation. the u.s. embassy is urging people within 50 miles of the nuclear plant to evacuate. that's 1.9 million people. japanese officials have told those living within 12 to 19 miles to stay indoors. earlier, the government evacuated about 200,000 people living within a 12-mile radius. and of course the biggest risk is to workers inside the plant trying to avoid a meltdown. more from dr. begsanjay gupta. >>> an important piece of the puzzle, what are radiation levels inside the plant? we know the levels are higher inside where workers are trying to do their work. they try and protect themselves with this, a hazmat suit. they may use a mask that has a little respirator on it. these sort of things provide some help against some forms of radiation but not against the most dangerous forms of radiation like gamma radiation. there's also little sensors that they may use to find out how much radiation they're being exposed to or what the contamination is. these aren't protecting people as much as giving them in the
carrying out any sort of no-fly zone resolution like the one that was passed yesterday. in terms of u.s. involvement, when you think of a no-fly zone, the first thing that comes to mind is american fighter pilots flying over foreign country. but the u.s. has many more ways that it could contribute to this effort. from folks i've been speaking to here in the building, there's also could be the possibility of unmanned drones being used in the area. the u.s. has signal jamming aircraft that could disrupt the communication between colonel gadhafi and some of his forces. they also have radar aircraft that could help coordinate some of the air traffic control if you had planes going out on no fly missions. even planes from other countries. right now, the u.s. has about five warships in that area, although the aircraft carrier, the "uss enterprise" that was in the mediterranean sea has now left. left earlier this week and now out in the arabian sea. there has been, within the u.s., a real debate about this no-fly zone primarily on two fronts. one says the u.s. waited much too long. in fact, th
hear last week, general carter hamm leading the u.s. effort there to enforce the no-fly zone, describing misrata specifically and saying it was very difficult to know exactly where the opposition was, exactly where the government was, exactly where the civilians were and exactly where these heavy weapons were because they are hideing in houses. as we drove out of misrata yesterday we saw soldiers with their vehicles hiding inside buildings, inside buildings. they had driven in through the store fronts and hiding inside the stores and the tanks hiding under trees, so this makes it very, very hard for aircraft to see these heavy weapons and to target them easily without the fear of injuring civilians and that is the challenge that these aircraft flying overhead are facing right now, carol. >> nic robertson reporting live in tripoli, thanks. >>> president obama goes on television to face a war weary nation that would be our own, he says ignoring moammar gadhafi threats of slaughtering civilians would have betrayed our values as americans, but he said using the military to force
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